.

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive.

It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies.

The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience.

They may be more likely to go to Heaven yet at the same time likelier to make a Hell of earth.

This very kindness stings with intolerable insult.

To be „cured“ against one’s will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals.

God in the Dock: Essays on Theology (Making of Modern Theology)

Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963) was a British writer and lay theologian.

He is best known for his works of fiction, especially The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space Trilogy, and for his non-fiction Christian apologetics, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain.

Lewis and fellow novelist J. R. R. Tolkien were close friends. They both served on the English faculty at Oxford University and were active in the informal Oxford literary group known as the Inklings.

According to Lewis‘s memoir Surprised by Joy, he was baptized in the Church of Ireland, but fell away from his faith during adolescence.

Lewis returned to Anglicanism at the age of 32, owing to the influence of Tolkien and other friends, and he became an „ordinary layman of the Church of England“.

Lewis‘s faith profoundly affected his work, and his wartime radio broadcasts on the subject of Christianity brought him wide acclaim.

Lewis wrote more than 30 books which have been translated into more than 30 languages and have sold millions of copies. His philosophical writings are widely cited by Christian apologists from many denominations.