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Nothing so promotes the growth of consciousness as the inner confrontation of opposites.

Carl Gustav Jung (1875 – 1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who founded analytical psychology.

Jung‘s work was influential in the fields of psychiatry, anthropology, archaeology, literature, philosophy, and religious studies. He worked as a research scientist at the famous Burghölzli hospital, under Eugen Bleuler.

During this time, he came to the attention of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. The two men conducted a lengthy correspondence and collaborated, for a while, on a joint vision of human psychology.

Memories, Dreams, Reflections is a partially autobiographical book by Jung and an associate, Aniela Jaffé. First published in German in 1962, an English translation appeared in 1963.

Memories, Dreams, Reflections details Jung‘s childhood, his personal life, and his exploration of the psyche.

The decisive question for man is: Is he related to something infinite or not?

That is the telling question of his life.

Only if we know that the thing which truly matters is the infinite can we avoid fixing our interests upon futilities, and upon all kinds of goals which are not of real importance.

Thus we demand that the world grant us recognition for qualities which we regard as personal possessions: our talent or our beauty.

The more a man lays stress on false possessions, and the less sensitivity he has for what is essential, the less satisfying is his life.

He feels limited because he has limited aims, and the result is envy and jealousy.

If we understand and feel that here in this life we already have a link with the infinite, desires and attitudes change.

We no longer live on what we have, but on promises, no longer in the present day, but in the darkness of the future, which, we expect, will at last bring the proper sunrise.

We refuse to recognize that everything better is purchased at the price of something worse; that, for example, the hope of grater freedom is canceled out by increased enslavement to the state, not to speak of the terrible perils to which the most brilliant discoveries of science expose us.

The less we understand of what our forebears sought, the less we understand ourselves, and thus we help with all our might to rob the individual of his roots and his guiding instincts, so that he becomes a particle in the mass, ruled only by what Neitzche called the spirit of gravity.

Whenever we give up, leave behind, and forget too much, there is always the danger that the things we have neglected will return with added force.

The meaning of my existence is that life has addressed a question to me.

Or, conversely, I myself am a question which is addressed to the world, and I must communicate my answer, for otherwise I am dependent upon the world’s answer.

Memories, Dreams, Reflections