.

The man who refuses to judge, who neither agrees nor disagrees, who declares that there are no absolutes and believes that he escapes responsibility, is the man responsible for all the blood that is now spilled in the world.

Reality is an absolute, existence is an absolute, a speck of dust is an absolute and so is a human life.

Whether you live or die is an absolute.

Whether you have a piece of bread or not, is an absolute.

Whether you eat your bread or see it vanish into a looter’s stomach, is an absolute.

There are two sides to every issue: one side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil.

The man who is wrong still retains some respect for truth, if only by accepting the responsibility of choice.

But the man in the middle is the knave who blanks out the truth in order to pretend that no choice or values exist, who is willing to sit out the course of any battle, willing to cash in on the blood of the innocent or to crawl on his belly to the guilty, who dispenses justice by condemning both the robber and the robbed to jail, who solves conflicts by ordering the thinker and the fool to meet each other halfway.

In any compromise between food and poison, it is only death that can win.

In any compromise between good and evil, it is only evil that can profit.

In that transfusion of blood which drains the good to feed the evil, the compromise is the transmitting rubber tube.

Atlas Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged is a 1957 novel by Ayn Rand. Rand‘s fourth and final novel, it was also her longest, and the one she considered to be her magnum opus in the realm of fiction writing.

Atlas Shrugged includes elements of science fiction, mystery, and romance, and it contains Rand‘s most extensive statement of Objectivism in any of her works of fiction.

The book depicts a dystopian United States in which private businesses suffer under increasingly burdensome laws and regulations. 

The theme of Atlas Shrugged, as Rand described it, is „the role of man’s mind in existence“. 

The story of Atlas Shrugged dramatically expresses Rand‘s ethical egoism, her advocacy of „rational selfishness“, whereby all of the principal virtues and vices are applications of the role of reason as man’s basic tool of survival (or a failure to apply it): rationality, honesty, justice, independence, integrity, productiveness, and pride.

Rand‘s characters often personify her view of the archetypes of various schools of philosophy for living and working in the world.