.

Man can never know the loneliness a woman knows.

Man lies in the woman’s womb only to gather strength, he nourishes himself from this fusion, and then he rises and goes into the world, into his work, into battle, into art.

He is not lonely. He is busy.

The memory of the swim in amniotic fluid gives him energy, completion.

Woman may be busy too, but she feels empty.

Sensuality for her is not only a wave of pleasure in which she is bathed, and a charge of electric joy at contact with another.

When man lies in her womb, she is fulfilled, each act of love a taking of man within her, an act of birth and rebirth, of child rearing and man bearing.

Man lies in her womb and is reborn each time anew with a desire to act, to be.

But for woman, the climax is not in the birth, but in the moment man rests inside of her.

The Diary of Anaïs Nin

Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell (February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977), known professionally as Anaïs Nin was a French-Cuban American diarist, essayist, novelist, and writer of short stories.

Born to Cuban parents in France, Nin was the daughter of composer Joaquín Nin and Rosa Culmell, a classically trained singer.

Nin spent her early years in Spain and Cuba, about sixteen years in Paris (1924–1940), and the remaining half of her life in the United States, where she became an established author.

Nin wrote journals prolifically from age eleven until her death. Her journals, many of which were published during her lifetime, detail her private thoughts and personal relationships.

Her journals also describe her marriage to Hugh Parker Guiler and marriage to Rupert Pole, in addition to her numerous affairs, including those with psychoanalyst Otto Rank and writer Henry Miller, both of whom profoundly influenced Nin and her writing.

Nin spent her later life in Los Angeles, California, where she died of cervical cancer in 1977.