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Man has always been a venal animal.

The growth of populations, the huge costs of war, the incessant pressure of confiscatory taxation – all these things make him more and more venal.

The average man is tired and scared, and a tired, scared man can’t afford ideals. He has to buy food for his family.

In our time we have seen a shocking decline in both public and private morals.

You can’t expect quality from people whose lives are a subjection to a lack of quality.

You can’t have quality with mass production.

You don’t want it because it lasts too long.

So you substitute styling, which is a commercial swindle intended to produce artificial obsolescence.

Mass production couldn’t sell its goods next year unless it made what is sold this year look unfashionable a year from now.

We have the whitest kitchens and the most shining bathrooms in the world.

But in the lovely white kitchen the average person can’t produce a meal fit to eat, and the lovely shining bathroom is mostly a receptacle for deodorants, laxatives, sleeping pills, and the products of that confidence racket called the cosmetic industry.

We make the finest packages in the world. The stuff inside is mostly junk.

The Long Goodbye

Raymond Chandler (July 23, 1888 – March 26, 1959) was an American-British novelist and screenwriter. In 1932, at the age of forty-four, Chandler became a detective fiction writer after losing his job as an oil company executive during the Great Depression.

His first short story, „Blackmailers Don’t Shoot“, was published in 1933 in Black Mask, a popular pulp magazine. His first novel, The Big Sleep, was published in 1939.

In addition to his short stories, Chandler published seven novels during his lifetime. All but Playback have been made into motion pictures, some more than once. In the year before his death, he was elected president of the Mystery Writers of America.

Chandler had an immense stylistic influence on American popular literature. He is considered to be a founder of the hard-boiled school of detective fiction, along with Dashiell Hammett, James M. Cain and other Black Mask writers.

The protagonist of his novels, Philip Marlowe, like Hammett‘s Sam Spade, is considered by some to be synonymous with „private detective“. Both were played in films by Humphrey Bogart, whom many consider to be the quintessential Marlowe.

At least three of Chandler‘s novels have been regarded as masterpieces: Farewell, My Lovely (1940), The Little Sister (1949), and The Long Goodbye (1953).