.

Sigmund Freud (6 May 1856 – 23 September 1939) was an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis, a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst.

Freud was born to Galician Jewish parents in the Moravian town of Freiberg, in the Austrian Empire.

He qualified as a doctor of medicine in 1881 at the University of Vienna.

Upon completing his habilitation in 1885, he was appointed a docent in neuropathology and became an affiliated professor in 1902.

Freud lived and worked in Vienna, having set up his clinical practice there in 1886.

In 1938, Freud left Austria to escape the Nazis. He died in exile in the United Kingdom in 1939.

Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.

Words have a magical power. They can bring either the greatest happiness or deepest despair; they can transfer knowledge from teacher to student; words enable the orator to sway his audience and dictate its decisions. Words are capable of arousing the strongest emotions and prompting all men’s actions.

Being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise.

Life, as we find it, is too hard for us; it brings us too many pains, disappointments and impossible tasks. In order to bear it we cannot dispense with palliative measures… There are perhaps three such measures: powerful deflections, which cause us to make light of our misery; substitutive satisfactions, which diminish it; and intoxicating substances, which make us insensible to it.

It is that we are never so defenseless against suffering as when we love, never so helplessly unhappy as when we have lost our loved object or its love.

Instinct of love toward an object demands a mastery to obtain it, and if a person feels they can’t control the object or feel threatened by it, they act negatively toward it.

Human beings are funny. They long to be with the person they love but refuse to admit openly. Some are afraid to show even the slightest sign of affection because of fear. Fear that their feelings may not be recognized, or even worst, returned. But one thing about human beings puzzles me the most is their conscious effort to be connected with the object of their affection even if it kills them slowly within.

Love and work are the cornerstones of our humanness.

A love that does not discriminate seems to me to forfeit a part of its own value, by doing an injustice to its object; and secondly, not all men are worthy of love.

A man should not strive to eliminate his complexes but to get into accord with them: they are legitimately what directs his conduct in the world.

Out of your vulnerabilities will come your strength.

One day, in retrospect, the years of struggle will strike you as the most beautiful.

It is impossible to escape the impression that people commonly use false standards of measurement — that they seek power, success and wealth for themselves and admire them in others, and that they underestimate what is of true value in life.

Men are more moral than they think and far more immoral than they can imagine.

The virtuous man contents himself with dreaming that which the wicked man does in actual life.

Our possibilities of happiness are already restricted by our constitution. Unhappiness is much less difficult to experience. We are threatened with suffering from three directions: from our own body, which is doomed to decay and dissolution and which cannot even do without pain and anxiety as warning signals; from the external world, which may rage against us with overwhelming and merciless forces of destruction; and finally from our relations to other men. The suffering which comes from this last source is perhaps more painful to us than any other.

The intention that man should be happy is not in the plan of Creation.

It is a predisposition of human nature to consider an unpleasant idea untrue, and then it is easy to find arguments against it.

Beauty has no obvious use; nor is there any clear cultural necessity for it. Yet civilization could not do without it.

The more perfect a person is on the outside, the more demons they have on the inside.

Smoking is indispensable if one has nothing to kiss.

Time spent with cats is never wasted.

Conscience is the internal perception of the rejection of a particular wish operating in us.

Nothing that is mentally our own can ever be lost.