.

Sometimes fate is like a small sandstorm that keeps changing directions. You change direction but the sandstorm chases you. You turn again, but the storm adjusts.

Over and over you play this out, like some ominous dance with death just before dawn. Why?

Because this storm isn’t something that blew in from far away, something that has nothing to do with you. This storm is you. Something inside of you.

So all you can do is give in to it, step right inside the storm, closing your eyes and plugging up your ears so the sand doesn’t get in, and walk through it, step by step.

There’s no sun there, no moon, no direction, no sense of time. Just fine white sand swirling up into the sky like pulverized bones. That’s the kind of sandstorm you need to imagine.

An you really will have to make it through that violent, metaphysical, symbolic storm. No matter how metaphysical or symbolic it might be, make no mistake about it: it will cut through flesh like a thousand razor blades.

People will bleed there, and you will bleed too. Hot, red blood. You’ll catch that blood in your hands, your own blood and the blood of others.

And once the storm is over you won’t remember how you made it through, how you managed to survive. You won’t even be sure, in fact, whether the storm is really over.

But one thing is certain. When you come out of the storm you won’t be the same person who walked in. That’s what this storm’s all about.

Kafka on the Shore

Kafka on the Shore is a 2002 novel by Japanese author Haruki Murakami. Its 2005 English translation was among „The 10 Best Books of 2005“ from The New York Times and received the World Fantasy Award for 2006.

Kafka on the Shore demonstrates Murakami‘s typical blend of popular culture, mundane detail, magical realism, suspense, humor, an involved plot…

It also features an increased emphasis on Japanese religious traditions, particularly Shinto. The main characters are significant departures from the typical protagonist of a Murakami novel, such as Toru Watanabe of Norwegian Wood and Toru Okada of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, who are typically in their 20s or 30s and have rather humdrum personalities.

However, many of the same concepts that were first developed in these and other previous novels re-occur in Kafka on the Shore.

The power and beauty of music as a communicative medium is one of the central ideas of the novel – the very title comes from a song Kafka is given on a record in the library.

The music of Beethoven, specifically the Archduke Trio is also used as a redemptive metaphor.

Metaphysics is also a central concept of the novel as many of the character’s dialogues and soliloquy are motivated by their inquiry about the nature of the world around them and their relation to it.

Among other prominent ideas are: the virtues of self-sufficiency, the relation of dreams and reality, the threat of fate, the uncertain grip of prophecy, and the influence of the subconscious.